Suspicious Activity Report (SAR)

A Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) is a document that requires financial institutions to report instances of potential fraud and money laundering activities. This tool was established by the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) of 1970, and in 1996, SARs became the standard form for reporting suspicious activity.

SARs serve as tools for monitoring any unusual activity within financial sectors where there’s a higher possibility of indicating potential illegal actions or posing a threat to public safety. Any activity that raises suspicion of an account holder attempting to conceal something or engage in an illegal transaction should be included in a SAR.

Frequently asked questions

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When is a Suspicious Activity Report Required?

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When Must a Suspicious Transaction Be Reported?

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What Happens After a SAR is Filed?

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Where Can I Find the SAR Form?

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What to Include in a SAR?

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Who Can File a Suspicious Activity Report?

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Who Regulates SARs?

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